3 Tips for Protecting Your Website

You have a certain skill set, which has brought you to where you are now — on the way to launching your breakthrough new business. Your skills, however, likely won’t include everything you need (except if you happen to be a genius, which is cool too). Somewhere along the way, you’re going to find you need to outsource talent, to find someone who can help in areas where you’re not quite as strong in. Now, that might be in marketing, finance, or writing — but today, we’re going to be focussing on developing your website.

Developers hold a lot of power — they literally have the power to change anything and everything on your website. So in order to protect your baby (and lessen worry), here are some things you can do to hedge your risks and protect your hard work.

1. Create an email just for your new website and its development.

This ensures that everything to do with your website is in one spot. It won’t be jumbled with the emails pertaining to other aspects of your business, and you can easily find what you want. After you’ve got that, use it as the primary email when setting up your website. Make yourself “administrator” and your developer “collaborator”. For Github, check it out here and Heroku here. That way you always have the final say!

2. Create an IP agreement with your developer

An intellectual property (IP) agreement, even if you don’t have the money to enforce (and most of us don’t, that’s okay!), it’s still worth establishing. It does say that you mean business and clearly lays out the dos and don’ts of the employment relationship. Make sure to include a line saying that at the end of the work relationship, they’ll hand over all the code and work property. Here is an example you can use for reference, (note: KahootsHQ, does not accept liability for any errors or omission in the contents of this document or which arise from it’s use).

3. Download a copy of the code and database

Try to do this weekly, or on some sort of regular basis. You definitely want a copy of your website, after all! If you’re using Github, this is super simple to configure. Just go to the repository you want to download, and on the right side-bar menu you will find a “Download ZIP” button. (Don’t forget to title the download with that day’s date!) Here’s how for reference.

And there you have it! Now, we’re not trying to point a sign reading “BE WARY OF ALL DEVELOPERS!” It’s just that sometimes when we haven’t shared our vision clearly or if there’s some sort of communication issue, things might not turn out the way you’d thought. Ensuring you’ve covered your basis during the initial website setup will help you keep calm during times of turmoil knowing your hard work and time is not at risk.

So there you have it! If you have any other tips, feel free to drop us a tweet!


Elizabeth Ching - KahootsHQElizabeth Ching | Guest Writer

Elizabeth is a spirited reader and writer, with an insatiable curiosity for technology and innovation. She enjoys blogging, tweeting, and slowly making her mark in the digital space.

5 Must-Read Books for the Entrepreneur or Wantrepreneur

If you’re starting your own company, you know that there are a ton of risks. You may have an amazing idea, but so do so many other people whose companies haven’t made it. What sets a good idea apart from a great company? How do you do it, and where do you go now that you’ve taken this leap of faith? These books are must-reads for every entrepreneur or future entrepreneur. They will help shape your business plans, ideas, and growth for every stage you encounter.

Book 11. Startup Opportunities: Know When to Quit Your Day Job by Sean Wise and Brad Feld You’ve got an idea, you’ve got a roadmap, and you’ve got the entrepreneurial spirit to create a startup. But there are more than five million entrepreneurs who will launch a new project each year, and only a fraction succeed. How do you know that yours will? Startup Opportunities is a practical book that guides you in evaluating your business plan and calculating your opportunity. Wise and Feld are two experienced entrepreneurs as well as investors, and they have an excess of experience and knowledge for starting a company from both points of view.

Why it’s a must-read: There is no way to guarantee your success in the market, but the knowledge and practical advice given in this book will allow you to definitely increase your chances.

BOOK 2

2. Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future by Peter Thiel Peter Thiel is the co-founder of Paypal and Palantir, with a net-worth of 2.2 billion. In other words, this man is an entrepreneurial genius. Going down the route of a startup includes a great number of risks – especially with establishing yourself in the market. Thiel’s idea of a zero to one company is to create a space in the market – a niche – so that you’ve got a monopoly. Instead of doing something that someone else is doing, which is starting from 1, do something without precedent, starting from 0. Zero to One is all about innovation and creation.

Why it’s a must-read: Thiel’s tone is optimistic, his successes inspiring, and his ideas applicable. This book will make you feel like you can succeed and gives you the recipe for it.

BOOK 3

3. Creativity Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull Starting with a dream of creating a computer-animated movie, thus launched the idea of the now giant that is Pixar Animation Studios. Ed Catmull is the co-founder and his book, Creativity Inc. is all about effective management and maintenance of your creativity. The book chronicles Catmull’s years of experience and wisdom told through the history and realization of Pixar.

Why it’s a must-read: Startups are founded on a base of innovation. This book tells you how to manage that innovation and effectively establish a creative organization.

BOOK 44. Growth Hacker Marketing: A Primer on the Future of PR, Marketing, and Advertising by Ryan Holiday With the incredible rise of technology, the web, and social media, there are now so many different ways to go about marketing and growing your brand without the traditional expenses. In other words, marketing hacks. Ryan Holiday, a media and business strategist, teaches you how to use media and create campaigns that help promote your brand.

Why it’s a must-read: When you’re starting your own company, you likely don’t have that much money. There are better (read: cheaper) ways to market yourself besides the traditional commercials and billboards. Holiday gives you the knowledge and the know-how to growth hack your way to success.

BOOK 55. Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…and Others Don’t by James Collins So you’ve established your startup, you’re doing well and turning it into a relatively stable company. Now what? You’re good… but how to you become great? John Collins, a business consultant and lecturer at Stanford, shares the results of research and data from a five-year project, on how and why some companies boom and others plateau. He takes real examples and analyzes them – what did the successful companies do differently? Good to Great gives you the what to do and what not to do from actual companies, so that you may shape a strategy that guides your own.

Why this is a must read: Collins gives you case studies of successes and failures. We all learn from mistakes, but they don’t always have to be our own. Each one of these books was personally suggested by one of the KahootsHQ team members.


Elizabeth Ching - KahootsHQElizabeth Ching | Guest Writer

Elizabeth is a spirited reader and writer, with an insatiable curiosity for technology and innovation. She enjoys blogging, tweeting, and slowly making her mark in the digital space.